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frame (v.)

Old English framian "to profit, be helpful, avail, benefit," from fram (adj., adv.) "active, vigorous, bold," originally "going forward," from fram (prep.) "forward; from" (see from). Influenced by related Old English fremman "help forward, promote; do, perform, make, accomplish," and Old Norse fremja "to further, execute." Compare German frommen "avail, profit, benefit, be of use."

Sense focused in Middle English from "make ready" (mid-13c.) to "prepare timber for building" (late 14c.). Meaning "compose, devise" is first attested 1540s. The criminal slang sense of "blame an innocent person" (1920s) is probably from earlier sense of "plot in secret" (1900), perhaps ultimately from meaning "fabricate a story with evil intent," which is first attested 1510s. Related: Framed; framing.

frame (n.)

c. 1200, "profit, benefit, advancement;" mid-13c. "a structure composed according to a plan," from frame (v.) and in part from Scandinavian cognates (Old Norse frami "advancement"). In late 14c. it also meant "the rack."

Meaning "sustaining parts of a structure fitted together" is from c. 1400. Meaning "enclosing border" of any kind is from c. 1600; specifically "border or case for a picture or pane of glass" from 1660s. The meaning "human body" is from 1590s. Of bicycles, from 1871; of motor cars, from 1900. Meaning "separate picture in a series from a film" is from 1916. From 1660s in the meaning "particular state" (as in Frame of mind, 1711). Frame of reference is 1897, from mechanics and graphing; the figurative sense is attested from 1924.

frame (adj.)

(of buildings), "made of wood," 1790, American English, from frame (n.).

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Definitions of frame from WordNet
1
frame (n.)
the framework for a pair of eyeglasses;
frame (n.)
a single one of a series of still transparent pictures forming a cinema, television or video film;
frame (n.)
alternative names for the body of a human being;
Synonyms: human body / physical body / material body / soma / build / figure / physique / anatomy / shape / bod / chassis / form / flesh
frame (n.)
(baseball) one of nine divisions of play during which each team has a turn at bat;
Synonyms: inning
frame (n.)
a single drawing in a comic strip;
frame (n.)
an application that divides the user's display into two or more windows that can be scrolled independently;
frame (n.)
a system of assumptions and standards that sanction behavior and give it meaning;
Synonyms: frame of reference
frame (n.)
the hard structure (bones and cartilages) that provides a frame for the body of an animal;
Synonyms: skeletal system / skeleton / systema skeletale
frame (n.)
the internal supporting structure that gives an artifact its shape;
Synonyms: skeleton / skeletal frame / underframe
frame (n.)
a structure supporting or containing something;
Synonyms: framework
frame (n.)
a framework that supports and protects a picture or a mirror;
the frame was much more valuable than the miror it held
the frame enhances but is not itself the subject of attention
Synonyms: framing
frame (n.)
one of the ten divisions into which bowling is divided;
2
frame (v.)
enclose in or as if in a frame;
frame a picture
Synonyms: frame in / border
frame (v.)
enclose in a frame, as of a picture;
frame (v.)
take or catch as if in a snare or trap;
The innocent man was framed by the police
Synonyms: ensnare / entrap / set up
frame (v.)
formulate in a particular style or language;
Synonyms: redact / cast / put / couch
frame (v.)
make up plans or basic details for;
frame a policy
Synonyms: compose / draw up
frame (v.)
construct by fitting or uniting parts together;
Synonyms: frame up
From wordnet.princeton.edu