Etymology
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frail (adj.)

mid-14c., "morally weak," from Old French fraile, frele "weak, frail, sickly, infirm" (12c., Modern French frêle), from Latin fragilis "easily broken" (from PIE root *bhreg- "to break"). It is the Frenchified form of fragile. Sense of "easily destroyed, liable to break" in English is from late 14c. The U.S. slang noun meaning "a woman" is attested from 1908; perhaps with awareness of Shakespeare's "Frailty, thy name is woman."

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Definitions of frail
1
frail (adj.)
physically weak;
an invalid's frail body
frail (adj.)
wanting in moral strength, courage, or will; having the attributes of man as opposed to e.g. divine beings;
frail humanity
Synonyms: fallible / imperfect / weak
frail (adj.)
easily broken or damaged or destroyed;
a frail craft
Synonyms: delicate / fragile
2
frail (n.)
the weight of a frail (basket) full of raisins or figs; between 50 and 75 pounds;
frail (n.)
a basket for holding dried fruit (especially raisins or figs);
From wordnet.princeton.edu