Etymology
Advertisement

Words related to fork

forked (adj.)

c. 1300, "branched or divided in two parts," past-participle adjective from fork (v.). Of roads from 1520s; from 1550s as "pointing more than one way." In 16c.-17c. sometimes with a suggestion of "cuckold," on the notion of "horned." Forked tongue as a figure of duplicitous speech is from 1885, American English. Double tongue in the same sense is from 15c.

Advertisement
forkful (n.)
1640s; see fork (n.) + -ful.
forklift (n.)
also fork-lift, by 1953, short for fork-lift truck (1946), from fork (n.) + lift (n.).
fourchette (n.)
1754, in reference to anatomical structures, from French fourchette, diminutive of fourche "a fork" (see fork (n.)).
pitchfork (n.)

"fork for lifting and pitching" (hay, etc.), commonly with a long handle and two prongs, mid-14c., altered (by influence of pichen "to throw, thrust;" see pitch (v.1)) from Middle English pic-forken (c. 1200), from pik (see pike (n.2)) + fork (n.). The verb, "to lift or throw with a pitchfork," is attested from 1837.

spork (n.)
1909, from spoon (n.) + fork (n.).