Etymology
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Words related to fore-

foresee (v.)

Old English foreseon "have a premonition," from fore- "before" + seon "to see, see ahead" (see see (v.)). Perhaps modeled on Latin providere. Related: Foresaw; foreseeing; foreseen. Similar formation in Dutch voorzien, German vorsehen.

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foreshadow (v.)

"indicate beforehand," 1570s, figurative, from fore- + shadow (v.); the notion seems to be a shadow thrown before an advancing material object as an image of something suggestive of what is to come. Related: Foreshadowed; foreshadowing. As a noun from 1831. Old English had forescywa "shadow," forescywung "overshadowing."

foreshorten (v.)

c. 1600, from fore- + shorten. Related: Foreshortened; foreshortening.

foresight (n.)

also fore-sight, early 14c., "insight obtained beforehand;" also "prudence," from fore- + sight (n.). Perhaps modeled on Latin providentia. Compare German Vorsicht "attention, caution, cautiousness."

foreskin (n.)

1530s, from fore- + skin (n.). A loan-translation of Latin prepuce.

forestall (v.)

late 14c. (implied in forestalling), "to lie in wait for;" also "to intercept goods before they reach public markets and buy them privately," which formerly was a crime (mid-14c. in this sense in Anglo-French), from Old English noun foresteall "intervention, hindrance (of justice); an ambush, a waylaying," literally "a standing before (someone)," from fore- "before" + steall "standing position" (see stall (n.1)). Modern sense of "to anticipate and delay" is from 1580s. Related: Forestalled; forestalling.

foretaste (n.)

early 15c., from fore- + taste (n.). As a verb, from mid-15c.

foretell (v.)

"predict, prophesy," c. 1300, from fore- + tell (v.). Related: Foretold; foretelling.

forethought (n.)

early 14c., "a thinking beforehand, the act of planning," verbal noun from forethink "think of something beforehand," from Old English foreþencan "to premeditate, consider;" see fore- + think. Meaning "prudence, provident care" is from 1719.

foretime (n.)

"a previous time," 1530s, from fore- + time (n.). Related: Foretimes.

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