Etymology
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foam (n.)

Middle English fom, fome (c. 1300), from Old English fam "foam, saliva froth; sea," from West Germanic *faimo- (source also of Old High German veim, German Feim), from PIE root *(s)poi-mo- "foam, froth" (source also of Sanskrit phenah; Latin pumex "pumice," spuma "foam;" Old Church Slavonic pena "foam;" Lithuanian spainė "a streak of foam"). The plastic variety used in packaging, etc., so called from 1937.

foam (v.)

Old English famgian "to emit foam, to boil," from the source of foam (n.). Sense of "become foamy, to froth" is from late 14c. Transitive sense is from 1725. Related: Foamed; foaming.

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Definitions of foam
1
foam (n.)
a mass of small bubbles formed in or on a liquid;
the beer had a thick head of foam
Synonyms: froth
foam (n.)
a lightweight material in cellular form; made by introducing gas bubbles during manufacture;
2
foam (v.)
become bubbly or frothy or foaming;
The river was foaming
Synonyms: froth / fizz / effervesce / sparkle / form bubbles
From wordnet.princeton.edu