Advertisement

flux (n.)

late 14c., "abnormally copious flow," from Old French flus "a flowing, a rolling; a bleeding" (Modern French flux), or directly from Latin fluxus (adj.) "flowing, loose, slack," past participle of fluere "to flow" (see fluent). Originally "excessive flow" (of blood or excrement), it also was an early name for "dysentery;" sense of "continuous succession of changes" is first recorded 1620s. The verb is early 15c., from the noun.

Others are reading

Advertisement
Advertisement
Definitions of flux from WordNet
1
flux (n.)
the rate of flow of energy or particles across a given surface;
flux (n.)
a flow or discharge;
Synonyms: fluxion
flux (n.)
a substance added to molten metals to bond with impurities that can then be readily removed;
flux (n.)
excessive discharge of liquid from a cavity or organ (as in watery diarrhea);
flux (n.)
a state of uncertainty about what should be done (usually following some important event) preceding the establishment of a new direction of action;
the flux following the death of the emperor
Synonyms: state of flux
flux (n.)
the lines of force surrounding a permanent magnet or a moving charged particle;
Synonyms: magnetic field / magnetic flux
flux (n.)
(physics) the number of changes in energy flow across a given surface per unit area;
Synonyms: flux density
flux (n.)
in constant change;
his opinions are in flux
the newness and flux of the computer industry
2
flux (v.)
move or progress freely as if in a stream;
Synonyms: flow
flux (v.)
become liquid or fluid when heated;
Synonyms: liquefy / liquify
flux (v.)
mix together different elements;
Synonyms: blend / mix / conflate / commingle / immix / fuse / coalesce / meld / combine / merge
From wordnet.princeton.edu