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flood (n.)

Old English flōd "a flowing of water, tide, an overflowing of land by water, a deluge, Noah's Flood; mass of water, river, sea, wave," from Proto-Germanic *floduz "flowing water, deluge" (source also of Old Frisian flod, Old Norse floð, Middle Dutch vloet, Dutch vloed, German Flut, Gothic flodus), from suffixed form of PIE verbal root *pleu- "to flow" (also the source of flow). In early modern English often floud. Figurative use, "a great quantity, a sudden abundance," by mid-14c.

flood (v.)

1660s, "to overflow" (transitive), from flood (n.). Intransitive sense "to rise in a flood" is from 1755. Related: Flooded; flooding.

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Definitions of flood
1
flood (n.)
the rising of a body of water and its overflowing onto normally dry land;
Synonyms: inundation / deluge / alluvion
flood (n.)
an overwhelming number or amount;
a flood of requests
Synonyms: inundation / deluge / torrent
flood (n.)
light that is a source of artificial illumination having a broad beam; used in photography;
Synonyms: floodlight / flood lamp / photoflood
flood (n.)
a large flow;
Synonyms: overflow / outpouring
flood (n.)
the act of flooding; filling to overflowing;
Synonyms: flowage
flood (n.)
the occurrence of incoming water (between a low tide and the following high tide); "a tide in the affairs of men which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune" -Shakespeare;
Synonyms: flood tide / rising tide
2
flood (v.)
fill quickly beyond capacity; as with a liquid;
The images flooded his mind
Synonyms: deluge / inundate / swamp
flood (v.)
cover with liquid, usually water;
The broken vein had flooded blood in her eyes
The swollen river flooded the village
flood (v.)
supply with an excess of;
flood the market with tennis shoes
Synonyms: oversupply / glut
flood (v.)
become filled to overflowing;
Our basement flooded during the heavy rains
From wordnet.princeton.edu