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flock (n.1)

Old English flocc "a group of persons, company, troop," related to Old Norse flokkr "crowd, troop, band," Middle Low German vlocke "crowd, flock (of sheep);" of unknown origin, not found in other Germanic languages; perhaps related to folc "people," but the metathesis would have been unusual for Old English.

In Old English of humans only; extended c. 1200 to "a number of animals of one kind moving or feeding together;" of domestic animals c. 1300. The special reference to birds is recent (19c.). Transferred to bodies of Christians, in relation to Christ or their pastor, from mid-14c.

flock (n.2)

"tuft of wool," mid-13c., also found in continental Germanic and Scandinavian, all probably from Old French floc, from Latin floccus "tuft of wool, lock of hair," a word of unknown origin.

flock (v.)

c. 1300 "gather, congregate" (intransitive), from flock (n.1). Related: Flocked; flocking.

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Definitions of flock from WordNet
1
flock (n.)
a church congregation guided by a pastor;
flock (n.)
a group of birds;
flock (n.)
(often followed by `of') a large number or amount or extent;
Synonyms: batch / deal / good deal / great deal / hatful / heap / lot / mass / mess / mickle / mint / mountain / muckle / passel / peck / pile / plenty / pot / quite a little / raft / sight / slew / spate / stack / tidy sum / wad
flock (n.)
an orderly crowd;
Synonyms: troop
flock (n.)
a group of sheep or goats;
Synonyms: fold
2
flock (v.)
move as a crowd or in a group;
Tourists flocked to the shrine where the statue was said to have shed tears
flock (v.)
come together as in a cluster or flock;
Synonyms: cluster / constellate / clump
From wordnet.princeton.edu