Etymology
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flagrant (adj.)

c. 1500, "resplendent" (obsolete), from Latin flagrantem (nominative flagrans) "burning, blazing, glowing," figuratively "glowing with passion, eager, vehement," present participle of flagrare "to burn, blaze, glow," from Proto-Italic *flagro- "burning" (source also of Oscan flagio-, an epithet of Iuppiter), corresponding to PIE *bhleg-ro-, from *bhleg- "to shine, flash, burn" (source also of Greek phlegein "to burn, scorch," Latin fulgere "to shine"), from root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn." Sense of "glaringly offensive, scandalous" (rarely used of persons) first recorded 1706, probably from common legalese phrase flagrante delicto "while the crime is being committed, red-handed," literally "with the crime still blazing." Related: Flagrantly.

updated on October 14, 2017

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Definitions of flagrant from WordNet

flagrant (adj.)
conspicuously and outrageously bad or reprehensible;
flagrant violation of human rights
Synonyms: crying / egregious / glaring / gross / rank
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.