Etymology
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fin (n.)

Old English finn "fin," from Proto-Germanic *finno (source also of Middle Low German vinne, Dutch vin), perhaps from Latin pinna "feather, wing" (see pin (n.)); or, less likely, from Latin spina "thorn, spine" (see spine).

U.S. underworld slang sense of "$5 bill" is 1925, from Yiddish finif "five," from German fünf (from PIE root *penkwe- "five") and thus unrelated. The same word had been used in England in 1868 to mean "five pound note" (earlier finnip, 1839).

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Definitions of fin
1
fin (n.)
the cardinal number that is the sum of four and one;
Synonyms: five / " / v / cinque / quint / quintet / fivesome / quintuplet / pentad / Phoebe / Little Phoebe
fin (n.)
one of a pair of decorations projecting above the rear fenders of an automobile;
Synonyms: tail fin / tailfin
fin (n.)
one of a set of parallel slats in a door or window to admit air and reject rain;
Synonyms: louver / louvre
fin (n.)
a shoe for swimming; the paddle-like front is an aid in swimming (especially underwater);
Synonyms: flipper
fin (n.)
a stabilizer on a ship that resembles the fin of a fish;
fin (n.)
organ of locomotion and balance in fishes and some other aquatic animals;
2
fin (v.)
equip (a car) with fins;
fin (v.)
propel oneself through the water in a finning motion;
fin (v.)
show the fins above the water while swimming;
The sharks were finning near the surface
Synonyms: break water
From wordnet.princeton.edu