Etymology
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film (n.)

Old English filmen "membrane, thin skin, foreskin," from West Germanic *filminjan (source also of Old Frisian filmene "skin," Old English fell "hide"), extended from Proto-Germanic *fello(m) "animal hide," from PIE root *pel- (3) "skin, hide."

Sense of "a thin coat of something" is 1570s, extended by 1845 to the coating of chemical gel on photographic plates. By 1895 this also meant the coating plus the paper or celluloid. Hence "a motion picture" (1905); sense of "film-making as a craft or art" is from 1920.

film (v.)

c. 1600, "to cover with a film or thin skin," from film (v.). Intransitive sense is from 1844. Meaning "to make a movie of" is from 1899. Related: Filmed; filming.

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Definitions of film
1
film (n.)
a form of entertainment that enacts a story by sound and a sequence of images giving the illusion of continuous movement;
the film was shot on location
Synonyms: movie / picture / moving picture / moving-picture show / motion picture / motion-picture show / picture show / pic / flick
film (n.)
a medium that disseminates moving pictures;
film coverage of sporting events
Synonyms: cinema / celluloid
film (n.)
photographic material consisting of a base of celluloid covered with a photographic emulsion; used to make negatives or transparencies;
Synonyms: photographic film
film (n.)
a thin coating or layer;
the table was covered with a film of dust
film (n.)
a thin sheet of (usually plastic and usually transparent) material used to wrap or cover things;
Synonyms: plastic film
2
film (v.)
make a film or photograph of something;
Synonyms: shoot / take
film (v.)
record in film;
The coronation was filmed
From wordnet.princeton.edu