Etymology
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fill (v.)

Old English fyllan "to fill, make full, fill up, replenish, satisfy; complete, fulfill," from Proto-Germanic *fulljanan "to fill" (source also of Old Saxon fulljan, Old Norse fylla, Old Frisian fella, Dutch vullen, German füllen, Gothic fulljan "to fill, make full"), a derivative of adjective *fullaz "full" (see full (adj.)). Related: Filled.

To fill the bill (1882) originally was U.S. theatrical slang, in reference to a star of such magnitude his or her name would be the only one on a show's poster. To fill out "write in required matter" is recorded from 1880.

fill (n.)

mid-13c., fille, "a full supply," from Old English fyllu "fullness, 'fill,' feast, satiety," from Proto-Germanic *full-ino- "fullness" (source also of Old High German fulli, German Fülle, Old Norse fyllr), noun of state from *fullaz "full" (see full (adj.)). Meaning "extra material in music" is from 1934.

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Definitions of fill
1
fill (v.)
make full, also in a metaphorical sense;
fill a container
fill the child with pride
Synonyms: fill up / make full
fill (v.)
become full;
The pool slowly filled with water
The theater filled up slowly
Synonyms: fill up
fill (v.)
occupy the whole of;
The liquid fills the container
Synonyms: occupy
fill (v.)
assume, as of positions or roles;
Synonyms: take / occupy
fill (v.)
fill, satisfy or meet a want or need or condtion ro restriction;
Synonyms: fit / conform to / meet / satisfy / fulfill / fulfil
fill (v.)
appoint someone to (a position or a job);
fill (v.)
eat until one is sated;
He filled up on turkey
Synonyms: fill up
fill (v.)
fill to satisfaction;
Synonyms: satiate / sate / replete
fill (v.)
plug with a substance;
fill a cavity
2
fill (n.)
a quantity sufficient to satisfy;
he ate his fill of potatoes
she had heard her fill of gossip
fill (n.)
any material that fills a space or container;
there was not enough fill for the trench
Synonyms: filling
From wordnet.princeton.edu