Etymology
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fiber (n.)

late 14c., fibre "a lobe of the liver," also "entrails," from Medieval Latin fibre, from Latin fibra "a fiber, filament; entrails," which is of uncertain origin, perhaps related to Latin filum "a thread, string" (from PIE root *gwhi- "thread, tendon") or to Latin findere "to split" (from PIE root *bheid- "to split").

Meaning "thread-like structure in animal bodies" is from c. 1600 (in plants, 1660s); hence figurative use in reference to force or toughness (1630s). As "textile material," 1827. Fiberboard is from 1897; Fiberglas is attested from 1937, U.S. registered trademark name; in generic use, with lower-case f- and double -s, by 1941. Fiber optics is from 1956.

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Definitions of fiber

fiber (n.)
a slender and greatly elongated substance capable of being spun into yarn;
Synonyms: fibre
fiber (n.)
coarse, indigestible plant food low in nutrients; its bulk stimulates intestinal peristalsis;
Synonyms: roughage
fiber (n.)
any of several elongated, threadlike cells (especially a muscle fiber or a nerve fiber);
Synonyms: fibre
fiber (n.)
the inherent complex of attributes that determines a persons moral and ethical actions and reactions; "education has for its object the formation of character"- Herbert Spencer;
Synonyms: character / fibre
fiber (n.)
a leatherlike material made by compressing layers of paper or cloth;
Synonyms: fibre / vulcanized fiber
From wordnet.princeton.edu