Etymology
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fey (adj.)

"of excitement that presages death," from Old English fæge "doomed to die, fated, destined," also "timid, feeble;" and/or from Old Norse feigr, both from Proto-Germanic *faigjo- (source also of Old Saxon fegi, Old Frisian fai, Middle Dutch vege, Middle High German veige "doomed," also "timid," German feige "cowardly"), from the same source as foe. Preserved in Scottish. Sense of "displaying unearthly qualities" and "disordered in the mind (like one about to die)" led to modern ironic sense of "affected."

updated on January 13, 2020

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Definitions of fey from WordNet

fey (adj.)
slightly insane;
Synonyms: touched
fey (adj.)
suggestive of an elf in strangeness and otherworldliness; "the fey quality was there, the ability to see the moon at midday"- John Mason Brown;
Synonyms: elfin
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.