Etymology
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fettle (n.)

"condition, state, trim," c. 1750, in a glossary of Lancashire dialect, from northern Middle English fettle (v.) "to make ready, fix, prepare, arrange" (late 14c.), which is of uncertain origin, perhaps akin to Old English fetian "to fetch" (see fetch (v.)); perhaps from Old English fetel "a girdle, belt," from Proto-Germanic *fatilaz (source also of German fessel "fetter, chain," Old Norse fetill "strap, brace"), from PIE *ped- (2) "container" (see vat). Related: Fettler; fettling.

updated on October 30, 2014

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Definitions of fettle from WordNet
1
fettle (v.)
remove mold marks or sand from (a casting);
2
fettle (n.)
a state of fitness and good health;
in fine fettle
From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.