Etymology
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fear (n.)

Middle English fere, from Old English fær "calamity, sudden danger, peril, sudden attack," from Proto-Germanic *feraz "danger" (source also of Old Saxon far "ambush," Old Norse far "harm, distress, deception," Dutch gevaar, German Gefahr "danger"), from PIE *pēr-, a lengthened form of the verbal root *per- (3) "to try, risk."

Sense of "state of being afraid, uneasiness caused by possible danger" developed by late 12c. Some Old English words for "fear" as we now use it were fyrhto, fyrhto; as a verb, ondrædan. Meaning "feeling of dread and reverence for God" is from c. 1400. To put the fear of God (into someone) "intimidate, cause to cower" is by 1888, from the common religious phrase; the extended use was often at first in colonial contexts:

Thus then we seek to put "the fear of God" into the natives at the point of the bayonet, and excuse ourselves for the bloody work on the plea of the benefits which we intend to confer afterwards. [Felix Adler, "The Religion of Duty," 1905]

fear (v.)

Old English færan "to terrify, frighten," from a Proto-Germanic verbal form of the root of fear (n.). Cognates: Old Saxon faron "to lie in wait," Middle Dutch vaeren "to fear," Old High German faren "to plot against," Old Norse færa "to taunt."

Originally transitive in English; long obsolete in this sense but somewhat revived in digital gaming via "fear" spells, which matches the old sense "drive away by fear," attested early 15c. Meaning "feel fear" is late 14c. Related: Feared; fearing.

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Definitions of fear
1
fear (v.)
be afraid or feel anxious or apprehensive about a possible or probable situation or event;
I fear she might get aggressive
fear (v.)
be afraid or scared of; be frightened of;
I fear the winters in Moscow
We should not fear the Communists!
Synonyms: dread
fear (v.)
be sorry; used to introduce an unpleasant statement;
I fear I won't make it to your wedding party
fear (v.)
be uneasy or apprehensive about;
I fear the results of the final exams
fear (v.)
regard with feelings of respect and reverence; consider hallowed or exalted or be in awe of;
Synonyms: reverence / revere / venerate
2
fear (n.)
an emotion experienced in anticipation of some specific pain or danger (usually accompanied by a desire to flee or fight);
Synonyms: fearfulness / fright
fear (n.)
an anxious feeling;
they hushed it up out of fear of public reaction
Synonyms: concern / care
fear (n.)
a feeling of profound respect for someone or something;
the fear of God
Synonyms: reverence / awe / veneration
From wordnet.princeton.edu