Etymology
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fain (adj.)

Old English fægen, fagen "glad, cheerful, happy, joyful, rejoicing," from a common Germanic root (cognates: Old Saxon fagan, Old Norse feginn "glad," Old High German faginon, Gothic faginon "to rejoice"), perhaps from PIE *pek- (1) "to make pretty." Often it means "glad" in a relative sense, "content to accept when something better is unobtainable." As an adverb, from c. 1200. Related: Fainly. Compare fawn (v.).

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Definitions of fain
1
fain (adv.)
in a willing manner;
I would fain do it
Synonyms: gladly / lief
2
fain (adj.)
having made preparations;
Synonyms: disposed / inclined / prepared
From wordnet.princeton.edu