Etymology
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evict (v.)

mid-15c., "recover (property) by judicial means," from Latin evictus, past participle of evincere "overcome and expel, conquer, subdue, vanquish; prevail over; supplant," from assimilated form of ex "out," or perhaps here merely intensive (see ex-) + vincere "conquer" (from nasalized form of PIE root *weik- (3) "to fight, conquer"). Sense of "expel by legal process" first recorded in English 1530s, from a post-classical sense of the Latin word. Related: Evicted; evicting. Compare evince.

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Definitions of evict

evict (v.)
expel or eject without recourse to legal process;
The landlord wanted to evict the tenants so he banged on the pipes every morning at 3 a.m.
evict (v.)
expel from one's property or force to move out by a legal process;
The landlord evicted the tenants after they had not paid the rent for four months
Synonyms: force out
From wordnet.princeton.edu