Etymology
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Words related to evangelist

eu- 
word-forming element, in modern use meaning "good, well," from Greek eus "good," eu "well" (adv.), also "luckily, happily" (opposed to kakos), as a noun, "the right, the good cause," from PIE *(e)su- "good" (source also of Sanskrit su- "good," Avestan hu- "good"), originally a suffixed form of root *es- "to be." In compounds the Greek word had more a sense of "greatness, abundance, prosperity," and was opposed to dys-.
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angel (n.)
Origin and meaning of angel

"one of a class of spiritual beings, attendants and messengers of God," a c. 1300 fusion of Old English engel (with hard -g-) and Old French angele. Both are from Late Latin angelus, from Greek angelos, literally "messenger, envoy, one that announces," in the New Testament "divine messenger," which is possibly related to angaros "mounted courier," both from an unknown Oriental word (Watkins compares Sanskrit ajira- "swift;" Klein suggests Semitic sources). Used in Scriptural translations for Hebrew mal'akh (yehowah) "messenger (of Jehovah)," from base l-'-k "to send." An Old English word for it was aerendgast, literally "errand-spirit."

Of persons, "one who is loving, gracious, or lovely," by 1590s. The medieval English gold coin (a new issue of the noble, first struck 1465 by Edward VI) was so called for the image of archangel Michael slaying the dragon, which was stamped on it. It was the coin given to patients who had been "touched" for the King's Evil. Angel food cake is from 1881; angel dust "phencyclidine" is from 1968.

evangelical 
1530s "of or pertaining to the gospel" (adj.), also "a Protestant," especially a German one (n.); with -al (1) + evangelic (early 15c.), from Old French evangelique, from Late Latin evangelicus, from evangelista (see evangelist).

From mid-18c. in reference to a tendency or school in Protestantism seeking to promote conversion and emphasizing salvation by faith, the sacrifice of Christ, and a strictly religious life. As "member of the 'evangelical' party in a church" from 1804. Related: Evangelically; Evangelicalism (1812).
evangelism (n.)
1620s, "the preaching of the gospel," from evangel + -ism, or else from Medieval Latin evangelismus "a spreading of the Gospel," from Late Latin evangelium "good news, gospel," from Greek euangelion (see evangelist). In reference to evangelical Protestantism, from 1812.
evangelize (v.)
late 14c., from Old French evangeliser "to spread or preach the Gospel," and directly from Church Latin evangelizare, from Greek euangelizesthai (see evangelist). Related: Evangelized; evangelizing.
televangelist (n.)
1973, from tele(vision) + evangelist. Earliest usages are in reference to Rex Humbard (television evangelist is from 1958).