Etymology
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equivocation (n.)

late 14c., "the fallacy of using a word in different senses at different stages of the reasoning" (a loan-translation of Greek homonymia, literally "having the same name"), from Old French equivocation, from Late Latin aequivocationem (nominative aequivocatio), noun of action from aequivocus "of identical sound, of equal voice, of equal significance, ambiguous, of like sound," past participle of aequivocare, from aequus "equal" (see equal (adj.)) + vocare "to call," which is related to vox (genitive vocis) "voice" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak").

updated on September 03, 2020

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Definitions of equivocation from WordNet

equivocation (n.)
a statement that is not literally false but that cleverly avoids an unpleasant truth;
Synonyms: evasion
equivocation (n.)
intentionally vague or ambiguous;
Synonyms: prevarication / evasiveness
equivocation (n.)
falsification by means of vague or ambiguous language;
Synonyms: tergiversation
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.

Dictionary entries near equivocation

equity

equivalence

equivalent

equivocal

equivocate

equivocation

equivocator

equus

-er

er

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