Etymology
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Words related to enter

*en 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "in."

It forms all or part of: and; atoll; dysentery; embargo; embarrass; embryo; empire; employ; en- (1) "in; into;" en- (2) "near, at, in, on, within;" enclave; endo-; enema; engine; enoptomancy; enter; enteric; enteritis; entero-; entice; ento-; entrails; envoy; envy; episode; esoteric; imbroglio; immolate; immure; impede; impend; impetus; important; impostor; impresario; impromptu; in; in- (2) "into, in, on, upon;" inchoate; incite; increase; inculcate; incumbent; industry; indigence; inflict; ingenuous; ingest; inly; inmost; inn; innate; inner; innuendo; inoculate; insignia; instant; intaglio; inter-; interim; interior; intern; internal; intestine; intimate (adj.) "closely acquainted, very familiar;" intra-; intricate; intrinsic; intro-; introduce; introduction; introit; introspect; invert; mesentery.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit antara- "interior;" Greek en "in," eis "into," endon "within;" Latin in "in, into," intro "inward," intra "inside, within;" Old Irish in, Welsh yn, Old Church Slavonic on-, Old English in "in, into," inne "within, inside."
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entrance (n.)

1520s, "act of entering," from French entrance, from entrer (see enter). Sense of "door, gate" first recorded in English 1530s. Meaning "a coming of an actor upon the stage" is from c. 1600.

entrant (n.)
1630s, "one who enters, a beginner" (of professions, etc.); from French entrant, present participle of entrer (see enter). From 1838 with reference to one who enters a contest. As an adjective from 1630s.
entry (n.)
c. 1300, "act or fact of physically entering; place of entrance, means of entering a building; opportunity or right of entering; initiation or beginning of an action;" from Old French entree "entry, entrance" (12c.), noun use of fem. past participle of entrer "to enter" (see enter). Meaning "that which is entered or set down (in a book, list, etc.)" is from c. 1500.
re-enter (v.)

mid-15c., reentren, "to enter (a place) again or anew," from re-, denoting "repetition of an action," + enter. By 1838 in reference to an account or record. Related: Re-entered; re-entering.