Etymology
Advertisement

Words related to emphasis

en- (2)
word-forming element meaning "near, at, in, on, within," from Greek en "in," cognate with Latin in (from PIE root *en "in"), and thus with en- (1). Typically assimilated to em- before -p-, -b-, -m-, -l-, and -r-.
Advertisement
*bha- (1)

*bhā-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to shine."

It forms all or part of: aphotic; bandolier; banner; banneret; beacon; beckon; buoy; diaphanous; emphasis; epiphany; fantasia; fantasy; hierophant; pant (v.); -phane; phanero-; phantasm; phantasmagoria; phantom; phase; phene; phenetic; pheno-; phenology; phenomenon; phenyl; photic; photo-; photocopy; photogenic; photograph; photon; photosynthesis; phosphorus; phaeton; sycophant; theophany; tiffany; tryptophan.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit bhati "shines, glitters;" Greek phainein "bring to light, make appear," phantazein "make visible, display;" Old Irish ban "white, light, ray of light."

emphasize (v.)

"to utter or pronounce with emphasis, lay stress upon; bring out clearly or distinctly," 1765, from emphasis + -ize. Related: Emphasized; emphasizing.

emphatic (adj.)

"uttered, or to be uttered, with emphasis of stress or voice," 1708, from Latinized form of Greek emphatikos, variant of emphantikos, from stem of emphainein (see emphasis). Emphatical is earlier (1550s in rhetorical sense, 1570s as "strongly expressive"). Related: Emphatically (1580s).