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embrace (v.)

mid-14c., "clasp in the arms," from Old French embracier (12c., Modern French embrasser) "clasp in the arms, enclose; covet, handle, cope with," from assimilated form of en- "in" (see en- (1)) + brace, braz "the arms," from Latin bracchium (neuter plural brachia) "an arm, a forearm," from Greek brakhion "an arm" (see brachio-). Related: Embraced; embracing; embraceable. Replaced Old English clyppan (see clip (v.2)), also fæðm (see fathom (v.)). Sexual sense is from 1590s.

embrace (n.)

"a hug," 1590s, from embrace (v.). Earlier noun was embracing (late 14c.). Middle English embrace (n.) meant "bribery."

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Definitions of embrace
1
embrace (v.)
include in scope; include as part of something broader; have as one's sphere or territory;
Synonyms: encompass / comprehend / cover
embrace (v.)
hold (someone) tightly in your arms, usually with fondness;
They embraced
Synonyms: hug / bosom / squeeze
embrace (v.)
take up the cause, ideology, practice, method, of someone and use it as one's own;
She embraced Catholicism
Synonyms: espouse / adopt / sweep up
2
embrace (n.)
the act of clasping another person in the arms (as in greeting or affection);
Synonyms: embracing / embracement
embrace (n.)
the state of taking in or encircling;
an island in the embrace of the sea
embrace (n.)
a close affectionate and protective acceptance;
his willing embrace of new ideas
Synonyms: bosom
From wordnet.princeton.edu