Etymology
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eight (adj., n.)

"1 more than seven, twice four; the number which is one more than seven; a symbol representing this number;" late 14c., eighte, earlier ehte (c. 1200), from Old English eahta, æhta, from Proto-Germanic *akhto (source also of Old Saxon ahto, Old Frisian ahta, Old Norse atta, Swedish åtta, Dutch acht, Old High German Ahto, German acht, Gothic ahtau), from PIE *okto(u) "eight" (source also of Sanskrit astau, Avestan ashta, Greek okto, Latin octo, Old Irish ocht-n, Breton eiz, Old Church Slavonic osmi, Lithuanian aštuoni). From the Latin word come Italian otto, Spanish ocho, Old French oit, Modern French huit. For spelling, see fight (v.).

Meaning "eight-man crew of a rowing boat" is from 1847. The Spanish piece of eight (1690s) was so called because it was worth eight reals (see piece (n.)). Figure (of) eight as the shape of a race course, etc., attested from c. 1600. To be behind the eight ball "in trouble" (1932) is a metaphor from shooting pool. Eight hours as the ideal length of a fair working day is recorded by 1845.

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Definitions of eight
1
eight (n.)
the cardinal number that is the sum of seven and one;
Synonyms: " / viii / eighter / eighter from Decatur / octad / ogdoad / octonary / octet
eight (n.)
one of four playing cards in a deck with eight pips on the face;
Synonyms: eight-spot
2
eight (adj.)
being one more than seven;
Synonyms: " / viii
3
Eight (n.)
a group of United States painters founded in 1907 and noted for their realistic depictions of sordid aspects of city life;
Synonyms: Ashcan School
From wordnet.princeton.edu