Etymology
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echo (n.)

mid-14c., "sound repeated by reflection," from Latin echo, from Greek echo, personified in classical mythology as a mountain nymph who pined away for love of Narcissus until nothing was left of her but her voice, from or related to ekhe "sound," ekhein "to resound," from PIE *wagh-io-, extended form of root *(s)wagh- "to resound" (source also of Sanskrit vagnuh "sound," Latin vagire "to cry," Old English swogan "to resound"). Related: Echoes. Echo chamber attested from 1937.

echo (v.)

1550s (intrans.), c. 1600 (trans.), from echo (n.). Related: Echoed; echoing.

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Definitions of echo
1
echo (n.)
the repetition of a sound resulting from reflection of the sound waves;
she could hear echoes of her own footsteps
Synonyms: reverberation / sound reflection / replication
echo (n.)
a reply that repeats what has just been said;
echo (n.)
a reflected television or radio or radar beam;
echo (n.)
a close parallel of a feeling, idea, style, etc.;
Napoleon III was an echo of the mighty Emperor but an infinitely better man
his contention contains more than an echo of Rousseau
echo (n.)
an imitation or repetition;
the flower arrangement was created as an echo of a client's still life
2
echo (v.)
to say again or imitate;
followers echoing the cries of their leaders
Synonyms: repeat
echo (v.)
ring or echo with sound;
Synonyms: resound / ring / reverberate
echo (v.)
call to mind;
His words echoed John F. Kennedy
Synonyms: recall
3
Echo (n.)
(Greek mythology) a nymph who was spurned by Narcissus and pined away until only her voice remained;
From wordnet.princeton.edu