Etymology
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ebb (n.)

Old English ebba "falling of the tide, low tide," perhaps from Proto-Germanic *af- (source also of Old Frisian ebba, Old Saxon ebbiunga, Middle Dutch ebbe, Dutch eb, German Ebbe), from PIE root *apo- "off, away." Figurative sense of "decline, decay, gradual diminution" is from late 14c. Ebb-tide is from 1776.

ebb (v.)

Old English ebbian "flow back, subside," from the root of ebb (n.). Figurative use in late Old English. Related: Ebbed; ebbing.

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Definitions of ebb
1
ebb (v.)
flow back or recede;
the tides ebbed at noon
Synonyms: ebb away / ebb down / ebb out / ebb off
ebb (v.)
hem in fish with stakes and nets so as to prevent them from going back into the sea with the ebb;
ebb (v.)
fall away or decline;
The patient's strength ebbed away
2
ebb (n.)
a gradual decline (in size or strength or power or number);
Synonyms: ebbing / wane
ebb (n.)
the outward flow of the tide;
Synonyms: reflux
From wordnet.princeton.edu