Etymology
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eager (adj.)

late 13c., "strenuous, ardent, fierce, angry," from Old French aigre "sour, acid; harsh, bitter, rough; eager greedy; lively, active, forceful," from Vulgar Latin *acrus (source also of Italian agro, Spanish agrio), from Latin acer "keen, sharp, pointed, piercing; acute, ardent, zealous" (from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce").

Meaning "full of keen desire" (early 14c.) seems to be peculiar to English. The English word kept a secondary meaning of "pungent, sharp-edged" till 19c. (as in Shakespeare's "The bitter clamour of two eager tongues," in "Richard II"). Related: Eagerly; eagerness. Eager beaver "glutton for work" [OED] is from 1943, U.S. armed forces slang.

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Definitions of eager
1
eager (n.)
a high wave (often dangerous) caused by tidal flow (as by colliding tidal currents or in a narrow estuary);
Synonyms: tidal bore / bore / eagre / aegir
2
eager (adj.)
having or showing keen interest or intense desire or impatient expectancy;
eager for success
eager helpers
eager to learn
an eager look
eager to travel abroad
From wordnet.princeton.edu

Dictionary entries near eager

e.t.a.

ea

-ea-

each

each other

eager

eagle

eaglet

Eames

-ean

ear