Etymology
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dual (adj.)

c. 1600, in grammar, "the form or number relating to two," from Latin dualis "that contains two; the dual number, duality," from duo "two" (from PIE root *dwo- "two"). General sense of "relating to two, expressing two, composed or consisting of two parts" is from 1650s. Related: Dually.

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Definitions of dual

dual (adj.)
consisting of or involving two parts or components usually in pairs;
dual controls for pilot and copilot
Synonyms: double / duple
dual (adj.)
having more than one decidedly dissimilar aspects or qualities; "the office of a clergyman is twofold; public preaching and private influence"- R.W.Emerson; "every episode has its double and treble meaning"-Frederick Harrison;
a double (or dual) role for an actor
Synonyms: double / twofold / two-fold / treble / threefold / three-fold
dual (adj.)
a grammatical number category referring to two items or units as opposed to one item (singular) or more than two items (plural);
ancient Greek had the dual form but it has merged with the plural form in modern Greek
From wordnet.princeton.edu