Etymology
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drain (v.)

Middle English dreinen, from Old English dreahnian "to draw off gradually, as a liquid; remove by degrees; strain out," from Proto-Germanic *dreug-, source of drought, dry, giving the English word originally a sense of "to make dry." Figurative meaning of "exhaust" is attested from 1650s. Intransitive sense of "to flow off gradually" is from 1580s. Related: Drained; draining.

drain (n.)

early 14c., dreine, "passage, pipe, or open channel for the removal of water or other liquid," from drain (v.). From 1721 as "act of draining, gradual or continuous outflow," usually figurative, of money, resources, etc. Colloquial expression down the drain "lost, vanished, gone to waste" is by 1930.

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Definitions of drain
1
drain (v.)
flow off gradually;
The rain water drains into this big vat
Synonyms: run out
drain (v.)
deplete of resources;
The exercise class drains me of energy
drain (v.)
empty of liquid; drain the liquid from;
We drained the oil tank
drain (v.)
make weak;
Life in the camp drained him
Synonyms: enfeeble / debilitate
2
drain (n.)
emptying something accomplished by allowing liquid to run out of it;
Synonyms: drainage
drain (n.)
tube inserted into a body cavity (as during surgery) to remove unwanted material;
drain (n.)
a pipe through which liquid is carried away;
Synonyms: drainpipe / waste pipe
drain (n.)
a gradual depletion of energy or resources;
a drain of young talent by emigration
a drain on resources
From wordnet.princeton.edu