Etymology
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doom (n.)

Middle English doome, from Old English dom "a law, statute, decree; administration of justice, judgment; justice, equity, righteousness," from Proto-Germanic *domaz (source also of Old Saxon and Old Frisian dom, Old Norse domr, Old High German tuom "judgment, decree," Gothic doms "discernment, distinction"), perhaps from PIE root *dhe- "to set, place, put, do" (source also of Sanskrit dhaman- "law," Greek themis "law," Lithuanian domė "attention").

Originally in a neutral sense but sometimes also "a decision determining fate or fortune, irrevocable destiny." A book of laws in Old English was a dombec. Modern adverse sense of "fate, ruin, destruction" begins early 14c. and is general after c. 1600, from doomsday and the finality of the Christian Judgment. Crack of doom is the last trump, the signal for the dissolution of all things.

doom (v.)

late 14c., domen, "to judge, pass judgment on," from doom (n.). The Old English word was deman, which became deem. Meaning "condemn (to punishment), pronounce adverse judgment upon" is from c. 1600. Related: Doomed; dooming.

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Definitions of doom
1
doom (v.)
decree or designate beforehand;
Synonyms: destine / fate / designate
doom (v.)
pronounce a sentence on (somebody) in a court of law;
Synonyms: sentence / condemn
doom (v.)
make certain of the failure or destruction of;
This decision will doom me to lose my position
2
doom (n.)
an unpleasant or disastrous destiny;
everyone was aware of the approaching doom but was helpless to avoid it
Synonyms: doomsday / day of reckoning / end of the world
From wordnet.princeton.edu