Etymology
Advertisement

don (n.)

title of respect, 1520s, from Spanish or Portuguese Don, a title of respect prefixed to a man's Christian name, from Latin dominus "lord, master, owner" (from domus "house," from PIE root *dem- "house, household").

 It took on a general sense of "person of high importance or leading position," hence the English university sense "fellow of a college, any college authority" (c. 1660), originally student slang. The underworld sense is by 1952, from Italian don. The fem. form is Portuguese Dona, Spanish Doña, Italian Donna.

don (v.)

"to put on (articles of clothing)," mid-14c. contraction of do on (compare doff). "After 1650 retained in popular use only in north. dialect; as a literary archaism it has become very frequent in 19th c." [OED]. Related: Donned; donning.

Others are reading

Advertisement
Advertisement
Definitions of don
1
don (n.)
teacher at a university or college (especially at Cambridge or Oxford);
Synonyms: preceptor
don (n.)
the head of an organized crime family;
Synonyms: father
2
don (v.)
put clothing on one's body;
The princess donned a long blue dress
Synonyms: wear / put on / get into / assume
3
Don (n.)
a Spanish gentleman or nobleman;
Don (n.)
Celtic goddess; mother of Gwydion and Arianrhod; corresponds to Irish Danu;
Don (n.)
a European river in southwestern Russia; flows into the Sea of Azov;
Synonyms: Don River
Don (n.)
a Spanish courtesy title or form of address for men that is prefixed to the forename;
From wordnet.princeton.edu