Etymology
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document (n.)

early 15c., "a doctrine;" late 15c., "teaching, instruction" (senses now obsolete), from Old French document (13c.) "lesson, written evidence" and directly from Latin documentum "example, proof, lesson," in Medieval Latin "official written instrument, authoritative paper," from docere "to show, teach, cause to know," originally "make to appear right," causative of decere "be seemly, fitting," from PIE root *dek- "to take, accept."

Meaning "written or printed paper that provides proof or evidence" is from early 18c., hence "anything bearing legible writing or inscription." Related: Documents.

document (v.)

1640s, "to teach with authority," a sense now obsolete; see document (n.). Meaning "to support by documentary evidence" is from 1711. Related: Documented; documenting.

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Definitions of document
1
document (n.)
writing that provides information (especially information of an official nature);
Synonyms: written document / papers
document (n.)
anything serving as a representation of a person's thinking by means of symbolic marks;
document (n.)
a written account of ownership or obligation;
document (n.)
(computer science) a computer file that contains text (and possibly formatting instructions) using seven-bit ASCII characters;
Synonyms: text file
2
document (v.)
record in detail;
The parents documented every step of their child's development
document (v.)
support or supply with references;
Can you document your claims?
From wordnet.princeton.edu