Etymology
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docile (adj.)

late 15c. (Caxton), "easily taught, quick to learn," from Italian or French docile, from Latin docilis "easily taught," from docere "to show, teach, cause to know," originally "make to appear right," causative of decere "be seemly, fitting," from PIE root *dek- "to take, accept." Sense of "obedient, submissive, easily managed, tractable" is recorded by 1774. Middle English also had docible "ready or willing to teach" (c. 1400).

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Definitions of docile

docile (adj.)
willing to be taught or led or supervised or directed;
the docile masses of an enslaved nation
docile (adj.)
ready and willing to be taught;
docile pupils eager for instruction
Synonyms: teachable
docile (adj.)
easily handled or managed;
a gentle old horse, docile and obedient
Synonyms: gentle
From wordnet.princeton.edu