Etymology
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distant (adj.)

late 14c., "standing or being apart from a given point or place," from Old French distant (14c.), from Latin distantem (nominative distans), present participle of distare "to stand apart, be remote," from dis- "apart, off" (see dis-) + stare "to stand," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm."

Sense of "separated by an unspecified but large space" is from early 15c.; meaning "remote or far off in time" is from c. 1600. Sense of "not cordial or familiar" is by 1709. Related: Distantly.

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Definitions of distant

distant (adj.)
separated in space or coming from or going to a distance;
a distant telephone call
a distant sound
distant villages
the sound of distant traffic
distant (adj.)
far apart in relevance or relationship or kinship;
a distant cousin
a distant likeness
Synonyms: remote
distant (adj.)
remote in manner;
a distant smile
Synonyms: aloof / upstage
distant (adj.)
separate or apart in time;
distant events
Synonyms: remote / removed
distant (adj.)
located far away spatially;
distant lands
Synonyms: remote
From wordnet.princeton.edu