Etymology
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dismiss (v.)

early 15c., dismissen, "release from court restraint or legal charges;" late 15c., "remove from office, service, or employment," apparently from Latin dimissus, past participle of dimittere "send away, send different ways; break up, discharge; renounce, abandon," from dis- "apart, away" (see dis-) + mittere "send, let go" (see mission). Meaning "send away, order or give permission to depart" is from 1540s.

The prefix was altered by analogy with many dis- verbs. Middle English also had dismit, in the same sense (late 14c.), with altered prefix but directly from the Latin verb, and dimit. Related: Dismissed; dismissing.

updated on August 31, 2018

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Definitions of dismiss from WordNet

dismiss (v.)
bar from attention or consideration;
She dismissed his advances
Synonyms: disregard / brush aside / brush off / discount / push aside / ignore
dismiss (v.)
cease to consider; put out of judicial consideration;
This case is dismissed!
Synonyms: throw out
dismiss (v.)
stop associating with;
Synonyms: send packing / send away / drop
dismiss (v.)
terminate the employment of; discharge from an office or position;
Synonyms: displace / fire / give notice / can / give the axe / send away / sack / force out / give the sack / terminate
dismiss (v.)
end one's encounter with somebody by causing or permitting the person to leave;
I was dismissed after I gave my report
Synonyms: usher out
dismiss (v.)
declare void;
Synonyms: dissolve
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.