Etymology
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dislocation (n.)

c. 1400, dislocacioun, "displacement of parts," originally of bones of the limbs, from Old French dislocacion (14c.), or directly from Medieval Latin dislocationem (nominative dislocatio), noun of action from past participle stem of dislocare "put out of place," from Latin dis- "away" (see dis-) + locare "to place," from locus "a place," which is of uncertain origin. General sense is from c. 1600.

Origin and meaning of dislocation
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Definitions of dislocation

dislocation (n.)
an event that results in a displacement or discontinuity;
Synonyms: disruption
dislocation (n.)
the act of disrupting an established order so it fails to continue;
the social dislocations resulting from government policies
Synonyms: breakdown
dislocation (n.)
a displacement of a part (especially a bone) from its normal position (as in the shoulder or the vertebral column);
From wordnet.princeton.edu