Etymology
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dishonor (v.)

mid-13c., "deprive of honor, disgrace," from Old French deshonorer (12c.), from Medieval Latin dishonorare (reformed from classical Latin dehonestare), from dis- "opposite of" (see dis-) + honorare "to honor," from honor "honor, dignity, office, reputation," which is of unknown origin. Related: Dishonored; dishonoring.

Origin and meaning of dishonor

dishonor (n.)

c. 1300, "want of honor in conduct; state of being disgraced; a violation of one's honor or dignity," from Old French deshonor (12c., Modern French déshonneur), from deshonorer (see dishonor (v.)). Meaning "a cause or source of shame" is from 1550s.

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Definitions of dishonor
1
dishonor (v.)
bring shame or dishonor upon;
he dishonored his family by committing a serious crime
Synonyms: disgrace / dishonour / attaint / shame
dishonor (v.)
force (someone) to have sex against their will;
dishonor (v.)
refuse to accept;
dishonor checks and drafts
Synonyms: dishonour
2
dishonor (n.)
a state of shame or disgrace;
he was resigned to a life of dishonor
Synonyms: dishonour
dishonor (n.)
lacking honor or integrity;
Synonyms: dishonour
From wordnet.princeton.edu