Etymology
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disdain (v.)

mid-14c., desdeinen, "think unworthy or worthless, look upon with contempt," from Old French desdeignier "disdain, scorn, refuse, repudiate" (Modern French dédaigner), from des- "do the opposite of" (see dis-) + deignier "treat as worthy," from Latin dignari "to deem worthy or fit," from dignus "worthy," from PIE root *dek- "to take, accept." Related: Disdained; disdaining.

Origin and meaning of disdain

disdain (n.)

mid-14c., desdeyn "scorn, a feeling of contempt mingled with aversion," earlier dedeyne (c. 1300), from Old French desdeigne(Modern French dédain), from desdeignier (see disdain (v.)). Sometimes in early Modern English shortened to sdain.

Origin and meaning of disdain

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Definitions of disdain
1
disdain (v.)
look down on with disdain;
Synonyms: contemn / despise / scorn
disdain (v.)
reject with contempt;
Synonyms: reject / spurn / freeze off / scorn / pooh-pooh / turn down
2
disdain (n.)
lack of respect accompanied by a feeling of intense dislike;
Synonyms: contempt / scorn / despite
disdain (n.)
a communication that indicates lack of respect by patronizing the recipient;
From wordnet.princeton.edu