Etymology
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Words related to dis-

digest (v.)
Origin and meaning of digest

late 14c., digesten, assimilate (food) in the bowels," also "divide, separate; arrange methodically in the mind," from Latin digestus past participle of digerere "to separate, divide, arrange," etymologically "to carry apart," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + gerere "to carry" (see gest). Meaning "assimilate mentally" is from mid-15c. Related: Digested; digesting.

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digest (n.)
Origin and meaning of digest

late 14c., in reference to Justinian's law codes in ancient Rome, from Late Latin digesta, from neuter plural of Latin digestus, literally "digested thing," noun use of past participle of digerere "to separate, divide, arrange," etymologically "to carry apart," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + gerere "to carry" (see gest). General sense of "collection of writings (literary, legal, scientific or historical) arranged under different heads" is from 1550s.

digestible (adj.)
Origin and meaning of digestible

"capable of being digested," late 14c., from Old French digestible, from Latin digestibilis, from digest-, past-participle stem of digerere "to separate, divide, arrange," etymologically "to carry apart," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + gerere "to carry" (see gest).

digestion (n.)
Origin and meaning of digestion

late 14c., digestioun, "conversion of food to a state in which it can be absorbed into the blood from the alimentary canal," from Old French digestion (13c.) and directly from Latin digestionem (nominative digestio) "digestion, arrangement," noun of action from past-participle stem of digerere "to separate, divide, arrange," etymologically "to carry apart," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + gerere "to carry" (see gest).

digestive (adj.)
Origin and meaning of digestive

early 15c., "of or pertaining to physiological digestion," also "promoting digestion," from Old French digestif (14c.) and directly from Late Latin digestivus "pertaining to digestion," from digest-, past-participle stem of Latin digerere "to separate, divide, arrange," etymologically "to carry apart," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + gerere "to carry" (see gest).

Earlier in English as a noun, "a preparation or medicine which aids digestion" (late 14c.), from French, short for medecin digestif. The noun in the French form digestif is attested from 1908.

digress (v.)
Origin and meaning of digress

"to turn away in speaking or writing from the direct or appointed course," 1520s, from Latin digressus, past participle of digredi "to go aside, depart, deviate," from dis- "apart, aside" (see dis-) + gradi "to step, go" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go"). Or perhaps it is a back-formation from digression. Related: Digressed; digressing.

digression (n.)
Origin and meaning of digression

late 14c., digressioun, "act of deviating from the main subject matter in speaking or writing," from Latin digressionem (nominative digressio) "a going away, departing," noun of action from past participle stem of digredi "to deviate," from dis- "apart, aside" (see dis-) + gradi "to step, go" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go").

digressive (adj.)
Origin and meaning of digressive

"characterized by digressing," 1610s, from Latin digressivus, from digress-, past-participle stem of digredi "to deviate," from dis- "apart, aside" (see dis-) + gradi "to step, go" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go").

dilapidate (v.)

1560s, "to bring (a building) to ruin, bring into a ruinous condition by misuse or neglect," from Latin dilapidatus, past participle of dilapidare "to squander, waste," originally "to throw stones, scatter like stones," from dis- "asunder" (see dis-) + lapidare "throw stones at," from lapis (genitive lapidis) "stone" (see lapideous). Perhaps the English word is a back-formation from dilapidation. Intransitive sense of "fall into total or partial ruin" is from 1712.

dilapidation (n.)
Origin and meaning of dilapidation

mid-15c., dilapidacioun, "wasteful expenditure, squandering;" late 15c., "state of disrepair, gradual ruin or decay, especially through misuse or neglect," from Late Latin dilapidationem (nominative dilapidatio) "a squandering," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin dilapidare "throw away, squander, waste," probably etymologically "scatter like stones," from dis- "asunder" (see dis-) + lapidare "throw stones at," from lapis (genitive lapidis) "stone" (see lapideous). "Taken in Eng. in a more literal sense than was usual in Latin" [OED].

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