Etymology
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digest (n.)

late 14c., in reference to Justinian's law codes in ancient Rome, from Late Latin digesta, from neuter plural of Latin digestus, literally "digested thing," noun use of past participle of digerere "to separate, divide, arrange," etymologically "to carry apart," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + gerere "to carry" (see gest). General sense of "collection of writings (literary, legal, scientific or historical) arranged under different heads" is from 1550s.

Origin and meaning of digest

digest (v.)

late 14c., digesten, assimilate (food) in the bowels," also "divide, separate; arrange methodically in the mind," from Latin digestus past participle of digerere "to separate, divide, arrange," etymologically "to carry apart," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + gerere "to carry" (see gest). Meaning "assimilate mentally" is from mid-15c. Related: Digested; digesting.

Origin and meaning of digest

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Definitions of digest
1
digest (v.)
convert food into absorbable substances;
I cannot digest milk products
digest (v.)
arrange and integrate in the mind;
I cannot digest all this information
digest (v.)
put up with something or somebody unpleasant;
Synonyms: endure / stick out / stomach / bear / stand / tolerate / support / brook / abide / suffer / put up
digest (v.)
become assimilated into the body;
Protein digests in a few hours
digest (v.)
systematize, as by classifying and summarizing;
the government digested the entire law into a code
digest (v.)
soften or disintegrate, as by undergoing exposure to heat or moisture;
digest (v.)
make more concise;
Synonyms: condense / concentrate
digest (v.)
soften or disintegrate by means of chemical action, heat, or moisture;
2
digest (n.)
a periodical that summarizes the news;
digest (n.)
something that is compiled (as into a single book or file);
Synonyms: compilation
From wordnet.princeton.edu