Etymology
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Words related to detoxify

de- 

active word-forming element in English and in many verbs inherited from French and Latin, from Latin de "down, down from, from, off; concerning" (see de), also used as a prefix in Latin, usually meaning "down, off, away, from among, down from," but also "down to the bottom, totally" hence "completely" (intensive or completive), which is its sense in many English words.

As a Latin prefix it also had the function of undoing or reversing a verb's action, and hence it came to be used as a pure privative — "not, do the opposite of, undo" — which is its primary function as a living prefix in English, as in defrost (1895), defuse (1943), de-escalate (1964), etc. In some cases, a reduced form of dis-.

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toxic (adj.)

1660s, from French toxique and directly from Late Latin toxicus "poisoned," from Latin toxicum "poison," from Greek toxikon (pharmakon) "(poison) for use on arrows," from toxikon, neuter of toxikos "pertaining to arrows or archery," and thus to a bow, from toxon "bow," probably from a Scythian word that also was borrowed into Latin as taxus "yew." Watkins suggests a possible source in Iranian taxša- "bow," from PIE *tekw- "to run, flee." As a noun from 1890. Toxic waste is by 1888 in medicine, "toxin;" by 1955 as "chemical or radioactive waste."

-fy 

word-forming element meaning "make, make into," from French -fier, from Latin -ficare, combining form of facere "to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

detoxicate (v.)

1867, "deprive of poisonous qualities;" see de- + toxic + -ate (2). Related: Detoxicated; detoxicating.

detox 

1972 as a verb, "subject (someone) with an addiction to detoxification," a colloquial abbreviation of detoxify; 1975 as a noun, "place for the treatment of alcoholics and drug addicts," a colloquial abbreviation of detoxification (center, facility, etc.).

detoxification (n.)

1905, of substances, "action of depriving of poisonous qualities;" 1971, "removal of addictive substances from the body," originally in reference to habitual heavy drinkers of alcohol; see detoxify + noun ending -ation. As a type of alternative health treatment, by 1997.