Etymology
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derivation (n.)

early 15c., derivacioun, originally in a now-obsolete sense in medicine, "a drawing off or away, a turning aside," from Old French dérivation (14c.) and directly from Latin derivationem (nominative derivatio) "a leading off, turning away," also "derivation of a word, etymology," noun of action from past-participle stem of derivare "to lead or draw off" (see derive).

Grammatical sense, "drawing or tracing of a word in its development or formation from its more original root or stem, a statement of the origin or history of a word" in English is from mid-15c. The general meaning "origination, descent" is from c. 1600; that of "act or fact of drawing or receiving from a source" is from 1650s.

updated on July 30, 2018

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Definitions of derivation from WordNet

derivation (n.)
the source or origin from which something derives (i.e. comes or issues);
music of Turkish derivation
he prefers shoes of Italian derivation
derivation (n.)
(historical linguistics) an explanation of the historical origins of a word or phrase;
Synonyms: deriving / etymologizing
derivation (n.)
a line of reasoning that shows how a conclusion follows logically from accepted propositions;
derivation (n.)
(descriptive linguistics) the process whereby new words are formed from existing words or bases by affixation;
`singer' from `sing' or `undo' from `do' are examples of derivations
derivation (n.)
inherited properties shared with others of your bloodline;
Synonyms: ancestry / lineage / filiation
derivation (n.)
drawing of fluid or inflammation away from a diseased part of the body;
derivation (n.)
drawing off water from its main channel as for irrigation;
derivation (n.)
the act of deriving something or obtaining something from a source or origin;
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.