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deport (v.1)

late 15c., "to behave," from Old French deporter "behave, deport (oneself)" (12c.), which also had a wide range of secondary meanings, such as "be patient; take one's (sexual) pleasure with; amuse, entertain; remain, delay, tarry; cheer, console, treat kindly; put aside, cast off, send away," from de "from, off" (see de-) + porter "to carry," from Latin portare "to carry," from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over." Related: Deported; deporting.

Origin and meaning of deport

deport (v.2)

"banish, transport or carry off from one country to another, especially forcibly," 1640s, from French déporter, from Latin deportare "carry off, transport, banish, exile," from de "off, away" (see de-) + portare "to carry," from PIE *prto-, suffixed form of root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over." Associated by folk etymology with portus "harbor." Related: Deported; deporting.

Origin and meaning of deport

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