Etymology
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deny (v.)

early 14c., "declare to be untrue or untenable," from Old French denoiir "deny, repudiate, withhold," from Latin denegare "to deny, reject, refuse" (source of Italian dinegarre, Spanish denegar), from de "away" (see de-) + negare "refuse, say 'no,' " from Old Latin nec "not," from Italic base *nek- "not," from PIE root *ne- "not."

From late 14c. as "refuse, refuse to grant or give," also "refuse to acknowledge, disavow, disown." Sense of "refuse access to" is from 1660s. Related: Denied; denying.

I may not understand what you say, but I'll defend to your death my right to deny it. [Albert Alligator, "Pogo," Sept. 26, 1951] 

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Definitions of deny

deny (v.)
declare untrue; contradict;
He denied the allegations
She denied that she had taken money
deny (v.)
refuse to accept or believe;
He denied his fatal illness
deny (v.)
refuse to grant, as of a petition or request;
The dean denied the students' request for more physics courses
the prisoners were denied the right to exercise for more than 2 hours a day
deny (v.)
refuse to let have;
Synonyms: refuse
deny (v.)
deny oneself (something); restrain, especially from indulging in some pleasure;
She denied herself wine and spirits
Synonyms: abnegate
deny (v.)
deny formally (an allegation of fact by the opposing party) in a legal suit;
Synonyms: traverse
deny (v.)
refuse to recognize or acknowledge;
Peter denied Jesus
From wordnet.princeton.edu