Etymology
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Words related to demography

demotic (adj.)

"of or belonging to the people," especially "pertaining to the common people, popular, vulgar," 1822, from Latinized form of Greek dēmotikos "of or for the common people, in common use," from dēmos "common people," originally "district," from PIE *da-mo- "division," from root *da- "to divide." Originally in English it was used in reference to the simpler of two forms of ancient Egyptian writing (opposed to hieratic or hieroglyphic); the broader sense is by 1831. Used of the popular form of modern Greek since 1927.

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-graphy 
word-forming element meaning "process of writing or recording" or "a writing, recording, or description" (in modern use especially in forming names of descriptive sciences), from French or German -graphie, from Greek -graphia "description of," used in abstract nouns from graphein "write, express by written characters," earlier "to draw, represent by lines drawn," originally "to scrape, scratch" (on clay tablets with a stylus), from PIE root *gerbh- "to scratch, carve" (see carve).
*da- 

*dā-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to divide."

It forms all or part of: betide; daimon; Damocles; deal (v.); deal (n.1) "part, portion;" demagogue; demiurge; democracy; demography; demon; demotic; dole; endemic; epidemic; eudaemonic; geodesic; geodesy; ordeal; pandemic; pandemonium; tidal; tide (n.) "rise and fall of the sea;" tidings; tidy; time; zeitgeist.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit dati "cuts, divides;" Greek dēmos "people, land," perhaps literally "division of society," daiesthai "to divide;" Old Irish dam "troop, company;" Old English tid "point or portion of time," German Zeit "time."

demographic (adj.)

1882, "of or pertaining to demography," from demography + -ic. As a noun, by 1998, short for demographic group or category. Related: Demographical; demographically; demographer (1877).

demographics (n.)
1967, the science of divining from demographic statistics; see demography + -ics. Originally in reference to TV audiences and advertisers.