Etymology
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delight (n.)

c. 1200, delit, "high degree of pleasure or satisfaction," also "that which gives great pleasure," from Old French delit "pleasure, delight, sexual desire," from delitier "please greatly, charm," from Latin delectare "to allure, delight, charm, please," frequentative of delicere "entice" (see delicious). Spelled delite until 16c.; the modern unetymological form is by influence of light, flight, etc.

Origin and meaning of delight

delight (v.)

c. 1200, deliten, intransitive, "to have or take great pleasure;" c. 1300, transitive, "to affect with great pleasure," from Old French delitier "please greatly, charm," from Latin delectare "to allure, delight, charm, please," frequentative of delicere "entice" (see delicious). Related: Delighted; delighting.

Origin and meaning of delight

updated on October 13, 2021

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Definitions of delight from WordNet
1
delight (v.)
give pleasure to or be pleasing to;
Synonyms: please
delight (v.)
take delight in;
he delights in his granddaughter
Synonyms: enjoy / revel
delight (v.)
hold spellbound;
Synonyms: enchant / enrapture / transport / enthrall / ravish / enthral
2
delight (n.)
a feeling of extreme pleasure or satisfaction;
his delight to see her was obvious to all
Synonyms: delectation
delight (n.)
something or someone that provides a source of happiness;
the new car is a delight
Synonyms: joy / pleasure
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.