Etymology
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defect (n.)

early 15c., "want or lack of anything," especially lack of something essential to perfection or completeness, from Old French defect and directly from Latin defectus "failure, revolt, falling away," noun use of past participle of deficere "to fail, desert," from de "down, away" (see de-) + combining form of facere "to do, make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

Origin and meaning of defect

defect (v.)

1570s, "to hurt, damage;" 1580s, "fail become deficient" (senses now obsolete); 1590s, "to desert, revolt," from Latin defectus, past participle of deficere "to fail, desert," from de "down, away" (see de-) + combining form of facere "to do, make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Related: Defected; defecting.

Origin and meaning of defect

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Definitions of defect
1
defect (n.)
an imperfection in a bodily system;
this device permits detection of defects in the lungs
visual defects
defect (n.)
a failing or deficiency;
that interpretation is an unfortunate defect of our lack of information
Synonyms: shortcoming
defect (n.)
an imperfection in an object or machine;
if there are any defects you should send it back to the manufacturer
Synonyms: fault / flaw
defect (n.)
a mark or flaw that spoils the appearance of something (especially on a person's body);
Synonyms: blemish / mar
2
defect (v.)
desert (a cause, a country or an army), often in order to join the opposing cause, country, or army;
Synonyms: desert
From wordnet.princeton.edu