Etymology
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damage (n.)

c. 1300, "harm, injury; hurt or loss to person, character, or estate," from Old French damage, domage  "loss caused by injury" (12c., Modern French dommage), from dam "damage," from Latin damnum "loss, hurt, damage" (see damn). In law (as damages) "the value in money of what was lost or withheld, that which is given to repair a cost," from c. 1400. Colloquial sense of "cost, expense" is by 1755. Damage control "action taken to limit the effect of an accident or error" is attested by 1933 in U.S. Navy jargon.

Origin and meaning of damage

damage (v.)

"cause damage to, hurt, injure, harm," early 14c., from Old French damagier, from damage "loss caused by injury" (see damage (n.)). Related: Damaged; damaging.

Origin and meaning of damage

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Definitions of damage
1
damage (n.)
the occurrence of a change for the worse;
Synonyms: harm / impairment
damage (n.)
loss of military equipment;
Synonyms: equipment casualty
damage (n.)
the act of damaging something or someone;
Synonyms: harm / hurt / scathe
damage (n.)
the amount of money needed to purchase something;
how much is the damage?
Synonyms: price / terms
damage (n.)
any harm or injury resulting from a violation of a legal right;
Synonyms: wrong / legal injury
2
damage (v.)
inflict damage upon;
She damaged the car when she hit the tree
The snow damaged the roof
damage (v.)
suffer or be susceptible to damage;
These fine china cups damage easily
From wordnet.princeton.edu