Etymology
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cuss (n.)

1775, American English dialectal, "troublesome person or animal" (usually with a defining adjective), a vulgar pronunciation of curse (n.), or else a shortening of the slang sense of customer. The word in the literal sense of "a curse" is from 1848.

cuss (v.)

1815, "to say bad words, use profane language," a vulgar pronunciation of curse (v.). Transitive sense of "to curse, swear at" is by 1838. Related: Cussed; cussing. To cuss (someone) out is attested by 1881.

updated on September 13, 2018

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Definitions of cuss from WordNet
1
cuss (n.)
a persistently annoying person;
Synonyms: pest / blighter / pesterer / gadfly
cuss (n.)
a boy or man;
he's a likable cuss
Synonyms: chap / fellow / feller / fella / lad / gent / blighter / bloke
cuss (n.)
profane or obscene expression usually of surprise or anger;
Synonyms: curse / curse word / expletive / oath / swearing / swearword
2
cuss (v.)
utter obscenities or profanities;
Synonyms: curse / blaspheme / swear / imprecate
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.