Etymology
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Words related to curl

curling (n.)

"action of turning, bending, or forming into ringlets," mid-15c., verbal noun from curl (v.). Curling-iron "rod of iron to be used hot for curling the hair" is from 1630s.

The game played with stones on ice, originally Scottish, is so-called by 1610s, but the sense connection is obscure. "The name appears to describe the motion given to the stone" [OED]. Evidence of the sport dates to the early 16c. in Scotland; written accounts of the game date to the 1540s. A similar game is described from c. 1600 in Flanders.

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curly (adj.)

"having curls, tending to curl," 1770s, from curl (n.) + -y (2); earliest use is of hair. Related: Curliness.

cruller (n.)

kind of doughnut fried crisp in boiling lard, 1805, American English, apparently from Dutch kruller, from krullen "to curl," from Middle Dutch crullen, which is cognate with curl (v.). Compare Frisian krillen, Swedish krulla; also Middle English crullen "to curl (the hair)."

curler (n.)

1748, "one who or that which curls," agent noun from curl (v.). As "a cylinder for curling the hair," 1887. As "one who plays at curling," 1630s. Related: Curlers.

uncurl (v.)
1580s, intransitive; 1590s, transitive," from un- (2) "reverse, opposite of" + curl (v.).